(604) 563-2245 info@indigenousmaps.com

2018IMW

Schedule

August 20 – 23, 2018 | Le Westin, Montréal, Québec

DOWNLOAD SCHEDULE

Welcome to the Official Schedule for the 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop: Montréal, Québec. This year’s program is our most ambitious one yet. Within the schedule, you will find 8thematic tracks to help you navigate our 100+ sessions.

Day 1
2018-08-20
beaver hall
Ramezay
Palais
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Day 2
2018-08-21
Ramezay
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Day 3
2018-08-22
Le Westin Montréal
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Day 4
2018-08-23
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
beaver hall
Ramezay
Palais
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Ramezay
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Le Westin Montréal
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
Grande Place
Fortifications Ballroom
07:30 - 08:30
Breakfast
07:30 - 08:30
Registration

The Indigenous Mapping Network invites you to register for the 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop: Montreal, QC. Please check in at the registration desk.

08:30 - 08:45
Opening Prayer

Open prayer and welcome address delivered by Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke elders.

08:45 - 09:00
2018IMW: Opening Ceremony

The Indigenous Mapping Network and its strategic partners are excited to invite you to the 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop: Montreal 2018. As the largest Indigenous geospatial event in the world, we have brought together Indigenous governments and organizations, Indigenous cartographers, researchers, technologists, universities, policy makers, and government representatives from across North America to bring culturally relevant and appropriate earth observation technologies to support Indigenous rights and interests. The Indigenous Mapping Workshop creates a safe-space for community-based knowledge exchange and partnerships to promote decolonized and Indigenized geospatial technologies. Indigenous Maps

Steve DeRoy
Director, The Firelight Group
09:00 - 09:30
Government to Government Tribal Consultation

Successful tribal cultural resource consultation is vital concern for many Native American tribes in the United States. The Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community has been working on several strategies for preserving the landscape and the natural and cultural resources associated with their people. This presentation will discuss the reasoning for developing an online Arizona Government to Government Tribal Consultation Toolkit, as well as other strategies for preservation.

Angela D. Garcia-Lewis
Cultural Preservation Compliance Supervisor, Salt River Pima-Maricopa Indian Community
09:30 - 10:00
Mapping the Displacement of 60’s Scoop Survivors

The National Indigenous Survivors of Child Welfare Network ‘theNetwork’ has collaborated with the Dr. Raven Sinclair’s (University of Regina)  Pe-kīwēwin Project (Social Science and Humanities Research Council Insight Grant – 5 year) to create a GIS (Geographic Information System) Adoptee Diaspora Mapping program to create an innovative and interactive online platform to support 60’s scoop survivors to share their stories, visualize collective displacements, collect data on where survivors were taken from and displaced too, find family members, and identify resources in different territories.

The mapping project is participatory and interactive, with survivors inputting their own information. Visually, the Diaspora Mapping will be stunning and will show Adoptee displacement globally. It will also give researchers preliminary data on how many children were taken and where too.

Colleen Hele-Cardinal
Co-Founder and Coordinator
Dale Spencer
Associate Professor, Carleton University
10:00 - 10:30
Health Break
10:30 - 11:15
Panel: Indigenous Environmental Monitoring with Land and Water Defenders

The Indigenous Environmental Monitoring: Land and Water Defenders panel will present Indigenous community led actions against extractive industries, unwanted development, and climate change.

11:15 - 12:00
Panel: Methods, Theory, and Action for Indigenous Counter-Mapping

The Indigenous Counter-Mapping: Methods, Theory, and Action panel will discuss different approaches Indigenous nations us geospatial technologies to promote sovereignty and self-determination.

12:00 - 13:00
Lunch
13:00 - 14:30
Become an ArcGIS Pro

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Create high-quality maps on your computer using ArcGIS Pro, Esri’s premier desktop GIS application (provided freely to you through the IMW ArcGIS Online Organization). You’ll learn how to discover and save different sources of map data, and use analysis tools to create state-of-the-art, printable maps that you can share in meetings or publications. This is a great opportunity to learn the same mapping application used widely in industry, academic research, and the public sector.

13:00 - 14:30
Ideation Process, Identifying Problems RightMesh Can Solve

Trainers: Daniel Gillis and Keefer Rourke, University of Guelph

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

Learn about the eNuk application and how it sprung from the community needs within Rigolet. Next, we will discuss how to identify problems within their own communities and workshop potential solution, be it through RightMesh, or alternative means.

13:00 - 14:30
Open Data Sources and Portals in QGIS: Finding, Downloading and Understanding Data

Trainers: Lauren Tekano and Boyd Barrett, The Firelight Group

Room: Montréal, 11th Floor

This session will cover the basics of QGIS, and how it differs from other geospatial softwares. We will discuss how to access, download and interpret open data sources in QGIS. We will also learn how to add layers to QGIS, explore the GUI, discuss some useful QGIS plugins, and add and use basemaps.

13:00 - 14:30
Building a Collaborative Map with your Team using Google My Maps and My Maps Mobile (Basics)

Trainer: Dr. Cynthia Annett, Kansas State University and University of Alaska

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

This session will cover how to create quick and easy maps with My Maps, a simple tool for creating interactive and collaborative maps on the web. You’ll also learn how to continue working on your maps with your mobile device, both online and offline. You can choose to share your map with your field team only or to the public or even embed it on your website.

Dr. Cynthia Annett
Research Associate Professor, Kansas State University and University of Alaska
13:00 - 14:30
Put your Community on the Map with ArcGIS Online

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

Connect community, location, and information using ArcGIS Online. ArcGIS Online is a collaborative Web GIS that allows you to create and share interactive maps and apps. You can explore the free, ready-made data that you can add to your maps, or learn to add your own content to a map such as significant locations in your community, food harvesting areas, potential development sites, and more. Most of the Esri’s Web tools, including Survey123, Collector, Story Maps, and Web AppBuilder, are all integrated with ArcGIS Online. Come to this session to get an introduction to ArcGIS Online or to learn some new tips and tricks!

13:00 - 14:30
A Google Mapping Warm Up: Quick My Maps and Easy Tour Builder Stories (Accelerated)

Trainers: Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach and Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd.

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

This session will cover tools for easy content creation & storytelling. You’ll learn how to tell engaging stories about places of cultural and environmental importance using Tour Builder and by using virtual flyovers and tours in Google Earth. You’ll also learn how to use My Maps, a simple tool for creating interactive and embeddable maps on the web. This session will provide a starting point for people who may not be familiar with Google mapping tools but have some mapping experience, that will allow them to enter the Google stream at an accelerated pace.

Raleigh Seamster
Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach
Moka Apiti
Director, Digital Navigators Ltd.
13:00 - 14:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

13:00 - 14:30
Navigating the World of Open Source and Open Data Mapping Tools

Trainers: Marena Brinkhurst, Mapbox and Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada, and Aliya Ryan, Gregor MacLennan, and Jen Castro, Digital Democracy

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

The world of mapping tools is big – and when using open source tools and open data, it’s not always easy to see how all the different tools can fit together to meet your needs. Come discuss your projects with our open source and open data trainers to learn more about what tools could be useful and how they fit together. We’ll provide overview presentations about OpenStreetMap, Mapbox, QGIS, Mapeo, ODK, and more. Then we’ll break out into discussion tables for you to share and get feedback on your use cases and help you to plan which sessions to check out over the rest of the workshop.

14:30 - 00:00
Health Break
15:00 - 16:30
Ooh, Colours! Make Custom Styled Maps in Mapbox Studio

Trainers: Marena Brinkhurst, Mapbox and Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada, and Aliya Ryan, Digital Democracy

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Create a free Mapbox Studio account and work through a hands-on exercise to make a custom styled map. Learn about how to change the look of your map by changing colours, labels, and layers. We’ll upload a dataset (extracted from OpenStreetMap, iNaturalist, or Mapeo) and learn how to edit and style the new data layer. We’ll also go through how to add custom icons. Everyone will complete a custom map style that you can share and use in other projects!

15:00 - 16:30
Imagery from Space to Sky to Ground

Trainers: Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach and Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd.

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

Google Maps & Earth make a vast amount of imagery freely available to the public. In this session, you will get an overview of the tools and processes available for updating and adding to the satellite imagery in Google Earth and Maps. You’ll also learn how to collect your own 360-degree Street View imagery to include these virtual panoramas in your own maps and stories. Lastly, we’ll explore emerging techniques for collecting your own imagery with drones.

15:00 - 16:30
Community Surveys with G Suite and My Maps (Basics)

Trainer: Dr. Cynthia Annett, Kansas State University and University of Alaska

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

Looking for a set of tools to improve communication with your community? In this session, we will explore ways to use Google Forms to create surveys that can be sent through email or embedded in your website. Survey responses are automatically sent to an online spreadsheet and can be mapped using My Maps. You can efficiently manage the entire project (your survey form, response data and maps) using Google Drive, which uses passwords to protect your data and allows you to collaborate with colleagues.

15:00 - 16:30
Create and Use Interactive Surveys. It’s as Easy as ‘Survey123’

Trainer: Steve DeRoy, The Firelight Group

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

When you need a way to ask questions of community members, collect answers, and make use this information to inform decisions, Survey123 is the tool for you. The app is designed for people without GIS expertise to create and distribute interactive surveys just nothing more than a Web browser. With Survey123 you can also track the status of projects, perform resource inventories, and other applications. Learn how to create your own surveys, gather information, and watch as the results are updated on a Web map in ArcGIS Online.

15:00 - 16:30
This was my Family’s Cabin: Share Community Knowledge with Esri Story Maps

Trainer: Jeff Hackett, The Firelight Group

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

If a map could tell a story, what would it say? Esri Story Maps allows you to combine maps, text, videos, sound, and photos into a narrative. You can share results of a community project, showcase traditional knowledge and oral histories, and many more types of stories. A story map is an excellent way to engage and communicate with your community, administrators, and Band decision makers. Learn how to build your own Story Maps in this session.

15:00 - 16:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

07:30 - 08:30
Breakfast
08:30 - 08:45
Opening Prayer

Open prayer and welcome address delivered by Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke elders.

08:45 - 09:00
Daily Overview

Daily overview and housekeeping for 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop.

Jeffrey Hackett
Researcher, The Firelight Group
09:00 - 09:30
MappingBack: (Re)Mapping Indigenous Counter-Maps through Alternative Design

Territory is the central field of engagement between First Nations and the state and corporate actors that organize resource extraction projects. The territories in play, however, are not singular. They have multiple dimensions whose shape and significance vary enormously and indeed, are often in opposition. For Indigenous peoples these are homelands, spaces of living relations. For states and capital they are coded as unproductive wastelands whose only possible path to development depends on the extraction of their resources. Given the centrality of territory in resource conflicts it is of little surprise that cartography is one of the privileged representational technologies in play.

Annita Lucchesi
Doctoral Student, University of Lethbridge
09:30 - 10:00
Inspired by the Amazon: Co-Development of Tools and Methods for Community Mapping and Monitoring

Community mapping and monitoring programmes often arise out of local decisions to document what is happening on the land and in one’s territory. Recent technological advances have increased the number of tools available to help these processes, however how can communities find the best ones for their particular needs, and remain in control of the data collected?

Digital Democracy has been partnering with indigenous communities in the Amazon Basin for five years, providing support to navigate through the range of tools available and developing open source tools that are accessible, customisable, work fully in offline environments and facilitate team collaboration and local autonomy. We will discuss the Waorani of Ecuador’s detailed ethnocartography of a million hectares of ancestral territory, the monitoring of illegal gold mining and land invasions in Wapichan territory in Guyana and the Achuar peoples’ mapping and monitoring of the impacts of decades of oil extraction activities in Northern Peru.

We will share how we have used OpenDataKit, QGIS, Mapbox, and the new open-source Mapeo Platform for collecting, managing, and publishing mapping and monitoring data.

10:00 - 10:30
Health Break
10:30 - 11:15
Panel: Mapping the Future: Open Data, Drones, and Internet of Things

The Mapping the Future: Open Data, Drones, and Internet of Things panel discusses how new technologies are supporting Indigenous cartography.

11:15 - 12:00
Panel: Indigenous Cartography as Inter-Generational Knowledge Transfer

The Indigenous Cartography as Inter-Generational Knowledge Transfer panel discusses how geospatial technologies are used to promote knowledge exchange and storytelling.

12:00 - 13:00
Lunch
13:00 - 14:30
Mashing up Datasets with Google Earth Pro (Accelerated)

Trainers: Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd. and Guy Polden, The Firelight Group

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

In this session participants will learn how to bring different types of datasets into Google Earth Pro which will help in understanding your community, such as historical maps, GIS shapefiles, and GPS data.

13:00 - 14:30
Put your Community on the Map with ArcGIS Online

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

Connect community, location, and information using ArcGIS Online. ArcGIS Online is a collaborative Web GIS that allows you to create and share interactive maps and apps. You can explore the free, ready-made data that you can add to your maps, or learn to add your own content to a map such as significant locations in your community, food harvesting areas, potential development sites, and more. Most of the Esri’s Web tools, including Survey123, Collector, Story Maps, and Web AppBuilder, are all integrated with ArcGIS Online. Come to this session to get an introduction to ArcGIS Online or to learn some new tips and tricks!

13:00 - 14:30
Create and Share Stories About our World using Google Tour Builder (Basics)

Trainer: Dr. Cynthia Annett, Kansas State University and University of Alaska

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

This session will cover how to tell engaging stories about places of cultural and environmental importance that you can easily share online. Tour Builder can also be used as an engaging presentation tool, whether your audience is your community, school children, or an official meeting.

13:00 - 14:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

13:00 - 14:30
Become an ArcGIS Pro

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Create high-quality maps on your computer using ArcGIS Pro, Esri’s premier desktop GIS application (provided freely to you through the IMW ArcGIS Online Organization). You’ll learn how to discover and save different sources of map data, and use analysis tools to create state-of-the-art, printable maps that you can share in meetings or publications. This is a great opportunity to learn the same mapping application used widely in industry, academic research, and the public sector.

13:00 - 14:30
Offline, Collaborative Monitoring with Mapeo Mobile

Trainers: Aliya Ryan, Gregor MacLennan, and Jen Castro, Digital Democracy

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

In this session, we will introduce the main features of Mapeo Mobile, a new, free, open-source mobile app for collaboratively gathering monitoring and mapping data. It is easy to use and is built around community-led processes and local data management. Mapeo Mobile works fully in offline, remote environments, but should also work in central Montreal! (Note: Mapeo Mobile is only available for Android devices – but we’ll have some loaner devices if you use an iPhone.)

We will get everyone set up with Mapeo Mobile and do some data collection together outside, taking GPS points, photos and notes about things you observe. We will then come back together to discuss what you can do with the data once you’ve collected it; how to collaborate with others on your team; how the app can be customised to your communities’ particular needs for data collection; and how it can integrate with other tools you might already be using. We will also share some of the upcoming new features for the app which are in development and learn from you about what would be most useful for your uses, and what challenges you have with current tools. Join us to learn more about how to manage, edit and publish the data in our second session: Managing Monitoring Data with Mapeo Desktop.

13:00 - 14:30
QGIS as a Data Processing Tool

Trainer: Vincent Sarago, Mapbox

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Learn how to use QGIS to visualize, process and create dataset. QGIS (formerly known as Quantum GIS) is a popular open-source GIS with advanced capabilities (e.g custom scripts in python, R …). In this workshop, we will guide you through some QGIS basic and advanced features to make a dataset reveal its information and prepare datasets for use in other tools, like Mapbox Studio.

14:30 - 15:00
Health Break
15:00 - 16:30
Create VR tours with Tour Creator

Trainer: Courtney Hampson, Google AR & VR

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

Learn how to use 360 cameras and Street View imagery to build immersive 360 degree tours with Google’s Tour Creator. Once you create your tour, you can publish it to the web for people to see on their phone, computer, or in a VR viewer.

15:00 - 16:30
Collect field data with the Collector for ArcGIS mobile App

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Use the GPS in your smartphone or tablet to map locational data collected with Collector, one of Esri’s most popular mobile apps. You’ll learn how to create map layers to store points, lines, or areas, and then add these to a map that you can edit on your device. You’ll also learn how to add descriptions and photos to the locations you collect. Collector connects to a mobile network or Wi-Fi, or works completely offline when no network connection is available, making it incredibly useful in remote areas where there is no wireless or mobile service.

15:00 - 16:30
Create and Use Interactive Surveys. It’s as Easy as ‘Survey123’

Trainer: Steve DeRoy, The Firelight Group

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

When you need a way to ask questions of community members, collect answers, and make use this information to inform decisions, Survey123 is the tool for you. The app is designed for people without GIS expertise to create and distribute interactive surveys just nothing more than a Web browser. With Survey123 you can also track the status of projects, perform resource inventories, and other applications. Learn how to create your own surveys, gather information, and watch as the results are updated on a Web map in ArcGIS Online.

15:00 - 16:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

15:00 - 16:30
Making a Map in QGIS (I): Basic Analysis, Styling and Labeling

Trainers: Lauren Tekano and Boyd Barrett, The Firelight Group

Room: Montréal, 11th Floor

In this session, we will introduce and explore some important spatial analysis tools that you will likely encounter when working on a project. We will also learn how to apply symbology and labels to your maps in order to convey your message and tell your story.

15:00 - 16:30
Ideation Process, Identifying Problems RightMesh Can Solve

Trainers: Daniel Gillis and Keefer Rourke, University of Guelph

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

Learn about the eNuk application and how it sprung from the community needs within Rigolet. Next, we will discuss how to identify problems within their own communities and workshop potential solution, be it through RightMesh, or alternative means.

15:00 - 16:30
OpenStreetMap – A Free, Collaborative Map for Everyone!

Trainers: Marena Brinkhurst, Mapbox and Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada, and Aliya Ryan, Gregor MacLennan, and Jen Castro, Digital Democracy

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Learn about OpenStreetMap and the global community that creates and maintains it, and how you can be involved. You’ll create an account with OpenStreetMap and learn how to start adding to the map using iD Editor. We’ll cover how to create all the basic feature types and we will practice examples of adding roads, buildings, and points of interests (like schools, stores etc.). If we have time we can help you start doing some real mapping in your communities. We’ll also discuss ways to extract and use data once it is in OSM. Make sure your community is on the map!

15:00 - 16:30
Direct to Digital Mapping with Google Earth Pro (Accelerated)

Trainer: Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd. and Guy Polden, The Firelight Group

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

In this session, we’ll start with a quick overview of the Direct-to-Digital method using Google Earth Pro. Then we’ll focus on the challenge of maintaining data collected during field interviews and demonstrate methods in ArcGIS for designing and managing data tables linked to a Google Earth KML. Finally, we’ll discuss methods of sharing your map with others.

07:30 - 08:30
Breakfast
08:30 - 08:45
Opening Prayer

Open prayer and welcome address delivered by Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke elders.

08:45 - 09:00
Daily Overview

Daily overview and housekeeping for 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop.

Jeffrey Hackett
Researcher, The Firelight Group
09:00 - 09:30
eNuk: Using Blockchain Technology to Support Climate Change Monitoring

The eNuk Program is an integrated environment and health monitoring program designed by, with, and for Inuit in Rigolet, Nunatsiavut Labrador. Building on the community’s collective history, knowledge, and experience with monitoring, the goal of the eNuk Program is to streamline and incorporate the community’s existing research efforts into a comprehensive strategy for monitoring and responding to environmental and health indicators of climate change.

Monitoring environment- and health-related observations will help Inuit adapt to and plan for current and future changes. For example, environmental conditions are changing so rapidly in and around Rigolet that certain paths known to be safe in the past may now present unexpected dangers. In response, community members are actively finding ways to track changes in the environment and share timely, accurate information with each other regarding when and where it is safe to travel on the land. The eNuk Program will support these existing efforts to track and respond to environmental changes, and through the ongoing collection of environmental information will also help improve the understanding of, and preparation for, future climate and environmental changes in Rigolet in ways that also enhance and promote Inuit health.

Daniel Gillis
Associate Professor, University of Guelph
Dr. Jason Ernst
Chief Technology Officer, RightMesh
Inez Shiwak
Director, ‘My Word’: Storytelling and Digital Media Lab
09:30 - 10:00
Mapping Eeyou Istchee: The Cree Nation Government’s Place Name Program

The Crees of Northern Quebec are lucky in that they have benefitted from over 40 years of intermittent, but often intensive, place name research. Because of this work, the Cree Nation Government’s Place Names PostGIS database today has well over 14,000 Cree-language place names and is continuing to grow. This presentation will provide a brief overview of this history, and then discuss the challenges that confronted the Cree Nation Government when they renewed their place names program in 2013. In particular, the presentation will focus on the choices made in order to integrate a large body of already existing research, and the choices relating to the development of the lexical components of the place-names database.

10:00 - 10:30
Health Break
10:30 - 11:15
Panel: Alternative Indigenous Cartography Through Arts-Based Theory and Methods

The Alternative Indigenous Cartographers: Arts-Based Theory and Methods panel will discuss new ways of thinking and doing cartography. The systematic use of the artistic process, whether through drawing, painting, augmented reality, as a primary way of understanding and examining community-based spatial experiences through collective and collaborative arts-based theory and methods.

Annita Lucchesi
Doctoral Student, University of Lethbridge
11:15 - 11:45
Indigenous Vision Interactive mAPP

Speakers: Souta Calling Last and Tyler Walls, Indigenous Vision

Room: Montréal, 11th Floor

The Indigenous Vision Interactive Map and App is centered on empowering the Indigenous identity through virtual reclamation of traditional territories and asserting the Indigenous right and benefit of environmental stewardship. The resource will empower leaders, community members, and activists with a tool grounded in Tribal Ecological Knowledge (TEK) and reinforced by western science. The virtual reclamation of our landscape narrative will be achieved through the science of Indigenous geography and map making technology that includes virtual reality experiences. TEK explains characteristics of the landscape and eyewitness accounts of climate change marking the coming and going of various species. The Interactive Map and App is a revolutionary networking resource and educational tool that provides a platform to learn about history, culture, environmental science and efforts of protection. The project will allow for a large support network of native and non-native alike to educate and assist in the protection of land and water. Mapping layers focus on the risks and challenges to Indigenous stewardship and the close proximity of damaging industries and expansion of modern development.

11:45 - 13:00
Lunch: Birds of a Feather: Geospatial Networking Luncheon

Birds of a Feather: Geospatial Networking Sessions is an informal gatherings of like-minded individuals who wish to discuss a certain topic without a pre-planned agenda. Birds of a Feather allow groups to meet and discuss issues relating to regular conference sessions and talk out common problems facing the community. The session provides participants with an inclusive, information environment to share ideas freely. Grab your lunch and meet someone new. Learn, share, and explore!

Room: Grande Place, 8th Floor

13:00 - 14:30
Direct to Digital Mapping with Google Earth Pro (Basic)

Trainer: Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach and Steve DeRoy, The Firelight Group

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

Learn how to use Google Earth to map places of cultural and environmental importance discussed during a field interview. We’ll cover the basics of how to create all the feature types – points, lines, and polygons – for mapping Indigenous knowledge and traditional land use using the Direct-to-Digital method. You’ll also learn how to add further detail to mapped sites using text and images. Finally, we’ll discuss methods of sharing your map with others.

13:00 - 14:30
This was my Family’s Cabin: Share Community Knowledge with Esri Story Maps

Trainer: Jeff Hackett, The Firelight Group

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

If a map could tell a story, what would it say? Esri Story Maps allows you to combine maps, text, videos, sound, and photos into a narrative. You can share results of a community project, showcase traditional knowledge and oral histories, and many more types of stories. A story map is an excellent way to engage and communicate with your community, administrators, and Band decision makers. Learn how to build your own Story Maps in this session.

13:00 - 14:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

13:00 - 14:30
Managing Monitoring Data with Mapeo Desktop

Trainers: Aliya Ryan, Gregor MacLennan, and Jen Castro, Digital Democracy

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

In this session, we will introduce the main features of Mapeo Desktop, a tool for managing mapping and monitoring data. Mapeo Desktop facilitates teams to collaborate on data collection, keeps all your data private, locally owned and managed, and works fully in offline environments. You do not need internet to transfer data from Mapeo Mobile to Mapeo Desktop.

You will learn how to import data from Mapeo Mobile; how to visualise, edit and filter the data and how to create a report showing a selection of your findings including photos, GPS points and text. You will also learn how to use Mapeo Desktop’s features in conjunction with tools, such as a GPS or with ODK. We will finally look at how to export the data from Mapeo Desktop to a geojson or excel file, for you to use with other programmes.

13:00 - 14:30
Find Patterns and Make Decisions with ArcGIS Online

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

If you need to do more than place points on a map, ArcGIS Online’s easy-to-use and powerful analysis tools allow you to answer questions and make important decisions that go beyond simply recording spatial data. These tasks are especially useful for many aspects of land management and for visualizing data. Learn how your map produced from some straightforward spatial analysis can answer questions such as what is the best location for a new community building? What are the possible environmental impacts associated with a project? What are the potential impacts of development on nearby significant sites?

13:00 - 14:30
Open Maps: A Public Platform to Search, Discover, and Visualize Governmental Geospatial Data

Trainers: Josée-Anne Langlois and Sonia Trentin, Natural Resources Canada

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

This training module will give participants a better understanding of the tools and geospatial datasets available on the Government of Canada’s Open Maps website. Through a use case, participants will search for data, visualize them on the Open Maps viewer and add geospatial data from an external source in order to address a specific issue.

13:00 - 14:30
Presentation & Animation Techniques for Your Maps (Accelerated)

Trainer: Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd.

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

This session will share presentation & animation techniques to explore lands and maps in an engaging way. You will learn how to use Google Earth Pro to build virtual flyovers and tours to guide your audience through the landscape you’re discussing. You’ll look at Tour Builder as an alternative presentation tool to Google Earth Pro.

14:30 - 15:00
Health Break
15:00 - 16:30
Automate it! Simplify time-consuming tasks with ModelBuilder and Python in ArcGIS Pro

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Trim down the time required to do repetitive tasks by learning how to use the drag-and-drop ModelBuilder tool in ArcGIS Pro. You can use this to automate workflows, repeat them, and run them again later, without writing a line of code. You’ll also learn how to take this further and use the Python programming language with ArcGIS Pro, which is useful for creating entirely custom workflows.

15:00 - 16:30
No Coding, No Worries! Create a Web App for Processing Land Referrals

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

Create consistency and efficiency when responding to land referrals by developing a Web app customized for your community, all without writing a single line of code. Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS is user-friendly, flexible, and full of GIS functionality. Built into ArcGIS Online, it allows you to use your own maps and data to keep track of land referrals, overlay project footprints with significant sites, and assess the potential impact on your community according to criteria that you decide are important.

15:00 - 16:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

15:00 - 16:30
Next-Level OSM Editing with JOSM

Trainer: Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

Learn about JOSM, a graphical user interface for leveraging OSM data. JOSM allows the user to use existing OSM data, as well as add new OSM data, without directly uploading the data into the public/open OSM database. In this session you’ll install JOSM and learn how to import OSM data, manipulate the OSM data (e.g., add your own data, edit existing data), and then export the data for local use. We’ll cover how to create all the basic feature types and we will practice examples of adding roads, buildings, and points of interests (like schools, stores etc.) using JOSM’s add-on tools.

15:00 - 16:30
Coding is Cool! Make Interactive Web Maps with Mapbox (II)

Trainer: Marena Brinkhurst, Mapbox

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Learn about how to make interactive web maps and why you might want to use them. We’ll set up account with Mapbox and Github and then create a simple web page using Github and edit some Javascript code in Sublime Text to create a simple web map using Mapbox GL JS (a Javascript library) and styles from Mapbox Studio. We’ll work through adding various front-end elements (like a title and legend) and interactive elements like pop-up textboxes and a basemap toggle. We’ll work with a wildlife reporting dataset from iNaturalist. The goal is to complete a live web map online that you can share! We’ll also show you how to find more learning resources and other tutorials to expand your web map skills. (Beginners welcome – it’s okay if you’ve never worked with code before. If you have used Javascript, come learn about how to use it with Mapbox maps!).

15:00 - 16:30
Create VR tours with Tour Creator

Trainer: Courtney Hampson, Google AR & VR

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

Learn how to use 360 cameras and Street View imagery to build immersive 360 degree tours with Google’s Tour Creator. Once you create your tour, you can publish it to the web for people to see on their phone, computer, or in a VR viewer.

15:00 - 16:30
Mashing up datasets with Google Earth Pro (Basic)

Trainers: Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach and Dr. Cynthia Annett, Kansas State University and University of Alaska

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

In this session, participants will learn how to bring different types of datasets into Google Earth Pro which will help in understanding your community, such as historical maps, GIS shapefiles, and GPS data.

18:00 - 20:00
Mapathon: Mappers Unite!

Geographic Information Centre, McGill University, 5th Floor, Burnside Hall

The Mapathon is hosted in conjunction with the Indigenous Mapping Workshop and McGill’s Geographic Information Centre. The Mapathon is collaborative after-hours session between communities, researchers, and technology companies to build publicly accessible databases of valuable information of our communities and cities. The Mapathon will give participants the experience to learn and share about crowdsourced public knowledge via OpenStreetMaps. The Mapathon is a great opportunity for people to connect, share, and learn about open geospatial data. There is also free food. Yum!

07:30 - 08:30
Breakfast
08:30 - 08:45
Opening Prayer

Open prayer and welcome address delivered by Mohawk Council of Kahnawà:ke elders.

08:45 - 09:00
Daily Overview

Daily overview and housekeeping for 2018 Indigenous Mapping Workshop.

Jeffrey Hackett
Researcher, The Firelight Group
09:00 - 09:30
From Defense to Territorial Development: Santa Catarina Lxtahuacán Case Study

Access to land in Guatemala currently reflects one of the most unequal (Gini: 0.559) countries in the world (UNDP, 2005). Access to land in the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries was an indicator of wealth and exclusion that marked the great differences between rich and poor. Today, this gap is becoming increasingly wide, with severe consequences in terms of the possibilities for a sustainable development. This review tries to explain from a case study, how some communities of indigenous peoples even having access to land could not develop as societies because they were historically excluded from state policies, markets and development possibilities. Poverty* and underdevelopment can be two inter-related variables that could be caused by: the action of the State and its development policies, the intentional exclusion from political action, discrimination and the usurpation of lands managed by indigenous peoples and local communities. From the above, we can also infer that the social organization of traditional institutions is a mechanism of “defense of the territory” instead of an action to seek their own “territorial development”. From this approach we will try to answer briefly the following questions: What were the historical-political reasons that indigenous peoples and local communities with access to land to the PICL did not develop economically? Is the development of human communities guaranteed access to land?; How have ITPICLs or common governments evolved and what is their local status? What should be the conditions to promote sustainable rural development at present? Can Indigenous Traditional Institutions (ITIs) strengthen local and national governance in Guatemala? *Recent studies (INE, 2015) show that extreme poverty increased from 15.7% to 23.4% from 2000 to 2014, while extreme poverty did not increase from 40.3 to 59.3% (www.ine.gob.gt). More than 80% of the indigenous population lives in conditions of multidimensional poverty (16.3% in 2006, to 20.5%, in 2014); disaggregated, more than 90% of the population Mam, Q’eqchi and Quiché live in poverty and extreme poverty (UNDP, 2012).

Edgar Selvin Pérez
Biologist, San Carlos University
09:30 - 10:00
Constraints and Opportunities of Diffusing GIS Technology Throughout your Organization: A Case Example of the Mohawk Council of Kahnawake.

Operating within the framework’s visions outlined in the 2017/2018-2021/2022 Strategic Plan and the GIS strategic plan of 2013, our mandate is to deploy GIS as a service that will enable access to data and information, improve work processes, promote innovative solutions and help serve and support identity and prosperity of our community. Based on our experience of deploying GIS to our organization this presentation will highlight both the constraints and opportunities of introducing GIS technology to our work flows and the opportunities that were encountered from the unique collaboration between back end IT personnel and GIS administrators. The IT/GIS architecture’s foundation enabled an unexpected flourishing of content arising from units and from front end users representing diverse interests in government, academia, industry and traditional ecological knowledge. This goal of this presentation is to provide a rough framework and inspiration to help guide a successful integration of GIS architecture into your organization.

Bradford Dean
GIS Manager, Mohawk Council of Kahnawake
10:00 - 10:30
Health Break
10:30 - 11:15
Panel: The Role of Geospatial Technologies in Land Referrals

The Role of Geospatial Technologies in Land Referrals panel will discuss various geospatial technologies used to support land referrals within the context of resource development.

11:15 - 12:00
Panel: Recognizing Indigenous Rights Through Land-Use Planning

The Recognizing Indigenous Rights Through Land-Use Planning panel will discuss how land-use planning has become a powerful approach for Indigenous communities to promote sovereignty and self-determination over traditional territory and resources.

12:00 - 13:00
Lunch
13:00 - 14:30
Making a Map in QGIS (II): Using Managing Print Composer

Trainers: Lauren Tekano and Boyd Barrett, The Firelight Group

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

In this final QGIS session, we will continue to make our maps by using the QGIS Managing Print Composer. We will learn how to properly format a map, and add standard map elements, while also getting creative and allowing your map to tell your story.

13:00 - 14:30
Empower Youth and Enrich Student Learning with GIS in your Community’s Schools

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

Use the skills you’ve learned this week to engage the youth in your community’s school(s). ArcGIS Online, ArcGIS Pro, Survey123, Story Maps, Collector, and more, are freely available for use in K-12 education. See examples of how educators and students have been using GIS for land-based learning and to preserve and record culture and traditional knowledge. Learn what you can do to support your local students and to help to create opportunities for technical skills development in your community.

13:00 - 14:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

13:00 - 14:30
Use Direct-to-Digital Esri (D2De) Data Collection in ArcGIS Pro

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada, Jeff Hackett, The Firelight Group

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Build collections of quickly generated data for your community using Firelight’s D2D method adapted for use in ArcGIS Pro. You’ll learn how to use the new ArcGIS Pro D2De tool to draw points, lines, and areas on-screen and add information about each location. You’ll also learn how to anonymize the locations you collect and how to share these locations in printed maps or ArcGIS Online maps. This is a great way to collect data directly on your device, without needing a printed map, and to collect it on your own or with other community members.

13:00 - 14:30
Presentation & Animation Techniques for Your Maps (Basic)

Trainer: Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd.

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

This session will share presentation & animation techniques to explore lands and maps in an engaging way. You will learn how to use Google Earth Pro to build virtual flyovers and tours to guide your audience through the landscape you’re discussing. You’ll look at Tour Builder as an alternative presentation tool to Google Earth Pro and you will learn how to use the satellite images in Google Earth Engine’s Timelapse to show your audience change over time in the areas you care about.

13:00 - 16:30
Coding is Cool! Make Interactive Web Maps with Mapbox GL JS

Trainer: Marena Brinkhurst, Mapbox, Gregor MacLennan, Digital Democracy, and Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Learn about how to make interactive web maps and why you might want to use them. We’ll set up account with Mapbox and Github and then create a simple web page using Github and edit some Javascript code in Sublime Text to create a simple web map using Mapbox GL JS (a Javascript library) and styles from Mapbox Studio. We’ll work through adding various front-end elements (like a title and legend) and interactive elements like pop-up textboxes and a basemap toggle. We’ll work with a wildlife reporting dataset from iNaturalist. The goal is to complete a live web map online that you can share! We’ll also show you how to find more learning resources and other tutorials to expand your web map skills. (Beginners welcome – it’s okay if you’ve never worked with code before. If you have used Javascript, come learn about how to use it with Mapbox maps!).

13:00 - 14:30
Field Surveys & Data Collection with Open Data Kit (Accelerated)

Trainer: Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

This session will cover how to collect Traditional Ecological Knowledge and other information while offline in the field and sync it to a map, using Android mobile devices and Open Data Kit, an open source platform. Participants will learn how to collect, host and view information in a spreadsheet and on a map. You’ll also learn to build and deploy the survey forms, that can include questions, GPS readings, photos, audio and more.

14:30 - 15:00
Health Break
15:00 - 16:30
Timelapse & Earth Engine: Exploring Three Decades of Planetary Change

Trainer: Dr. Cynthia Annett, Kansas State University and University of Alaska

Room: Beaver Hall, 8th Floor

Timelapse builds on Earth Engine to show three decades of planetary change, both man-made and natural. In this session, you’ll be able to explore changes in areas you care about, use the animations in presentations, learn how to embed Timelapse into websites. We’ll review other useful datasets built through Earth Engine, such as global forest change and global water loss and gain.

15:00 - 16:30
Imagery from Space to Sky to Ground

Trainer: Moka Apiti, Digital Navigators Ltd. and Raleigh Seamster, Google Earth Outreach

Room: Palais, 8th Floor

Google Maps & Earth make a vast amount of imagery freely available to the public. In this session, you will get an overview of the tools and processes available for updating and adding to the satellite imagery in Google Earth and Maps. You’ll also learn how to collect your own 360-degree Street View imagery to include these virtual panoramas in your own maps and stories. Lastly, we’ll explore emerging techniques for collecting your own imagery with drones.

15:00 - 16:30
No Coding, No Worries! Create a Web App for Processing Land Referrals

Trainer: Susie Saliola, Esri Canada

Room: Viger, 8th Floor

Create consistency and efficiency when responding to land referrals by developing a Web app customized for your community, all without writing a single line of code. Web AppBuilder for ArcGIS is user-friendly, flexible, and full of GIS functionality. Built into ArcGIS Online, it allows you to use your own maps and data to keep track of land referrals, overlay project footprints with significant sites, and assess the potential impact on your community according to criteria that you decide are important.

15:00 - 16:30
Track Land-Use Changes in Your Community Over Time

Trainer: Jonathan Van Dusen, Esri Canada and James Villeneuve, Deimos Imaging, an UrtheCast Company

Room: Ramezay, 8th Floor

Satellite imagery allows you to view changes in land cover and land use in your community, such as deforestation, resource extraction, and urbanization. Without needing to download any software, you’ll learn how to find and analyze free satellite imagery, and how to compare images to view changes in the landscape over time. You’ll also learn how to save imagery layers to your ArcGIS Online account so that you can share your findings with your community, such as by creating Story Maps. Finally, you’ll learn how to use a Kanvas Origin portal from Deimos Imaging, an UrtheCast company, to view and analyze imagery for a particular community.

15:00 - 16:30
Open Maps: A Public Platform to Search, Discover, and Visualize Governmental Geospatial Data

Trainers: Josée-Anne Langlois and Sonia Trentin, Natural Resources Canada

Room: McGill, 8th Floor

This training module will give participants a better understanding of the tools and geospatial datasets available on the Government of Canada’s Open Maps website. Through a use case, participants will search for data, visualize them on the Open Maps viewer and add geospatial data from an external source in order to address a specific issue.

15:00 - 16:30
MappingBack: Designing Alternative Indigenous Maps

Trainer: Annita Lucchesi, University of Lethbridge, Sébastien Caquard, and Tom McGurk, Concordia University

Room: St. Paul, 8th Floor

During these sessions, participants will be invited to think about how they see their territory and to work with pencils, paper, painting, fabric, clay, scissors, computers and any other material to create maps that reflect their visions. The creation of these maps will be facilitated by Indigenous and non-indigenous mapmakers with experience in alternative forms of cartography. The overall goal of these sessions is to expose participants to the endless possibilities of representing territories, stories, and epistemologies differently, and to promote the development of spatial representations that emerge from members of Indigenous communities. Participants can join us for either 1, 2, 3 or 4 days of these sessions.

15:00 - 16:30
Open Data and Open Source Tools – Drop-In and Building Time

Trainer: Julia Conzon, Employment and Social Development Canada, Aliya Ryan, Gregor MacLennan, and Jen Castro, Digital Democracy

Room: Ste-Hélène, 8th Floor

Drop-in session for ideation and support on using open source tools for your projects. Trainers present have experience with Mapbox, OpenStreetMap, JOSM, R, Mapeo, and QGIS. Bring your ideas and questions to get 1:1 consultation! Or bring your projects and build with us.

16:30 - 17:00
Closing Ceremony
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