Workshop Agenda

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Day 1
2017-10-30
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Day 2
2017-10-31
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Day 3
2017-11-01
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Day 4
2017-11-02
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
Ambassador C
Ambassador A
08:00 - 08:45
Registration and Breakfast

The Indigenous Mapping Workshop team will welcome you at the registration tables. When you register at the Welcome Desk, you will be given your badge, delegate package, and datasets. Registration begins at 8:00 AM. You are welcome to breakfast and meet your fellow participants and trainers.

Location: Ambassador C

08:45 - 09:00
Opening Prayer

Location: Ambassador A

09:00 - 09:30
Welcome and Introduction

The Indigenous Mapping Workshop team will welcome all our participants, giving an overview of the 4-day workshop.

Location: Ambassador A

Steve DeRoy
Director, The Firelight Group
09:30 - 10:00
Training Overview

Our technology partners (Google, Esri Canada, Mapbox, and QGIS) will give an overview of the trainer sessions over the next 4-days.

Location: Ambassador A

Dr. Brent Hall
Director, Education and Research, Esri Canada
Marena Brinkhurst
Community Team, Mapbox
Donovan Cameron
GIS Adviso, Saulteau First Nations, Treaty and Lands Department
Raleigh Seamster
Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach
10:00 - 10:30
Keynote Presentation: Mapping the Digital Terrain—Towards Indigenous Geographic Information and Spatial Data Quality Indicators

Mapping spatial information to represent indigenous knowledge (IK) and rights has been taking place since the early 1970s in various parts of Canada. These mapping initiatives continue to be primarily associated with traditional land-use (TLU) studies and have deep roots in participatory methods that include aspects of participatory geographic information systems (PGIS). In the current context of encroaching industrial developments into indigenous homelands and the strengthening of Indigenous rights within Canadian Supreme Court rulings, the role of mapping TLU information is central. Who is conducting the research, what tools are used, and how this information is shared are all key questions being asked in the Indigenous context. As a result, the quality of spatial data has become a critical part of these engagement processes. This paper focuses on the intersections of new methods of TLU/IK data collection, namely a direct-to-digital approach that seeks to minimize misrepresentation and mistranslations of IK. From these intersections, the authors recognize the need to establish Indigenous-led quality indicators that directly address the introduction of new methods into the TLU/IK field. Indigenous geographic information and spatial data quality indicators will better address the current needs of Indigenous communities in the negotiation of resource developments in their territories, and provide a new path forward for enhancing the use of geospatial technologies in Indigenous communities.

Location: Ambassador A

Dr. Rachel Olson
Director, The Firelight Group
10:30 - 11:00
Coffee Break

Coffee, Tea, and Snacks.

Location: Ambassador C

11:00 - 11:30
Keynote Presentation: Mapping Trapper Positioning Systems (TPS) in Defense of Aboriginal Lands

Aboriginal Trappers, Hunters and Fishers have a complex and highly developed knowledge of their territories, passed down from countless generations and refined through extensive interaction with the land. This understanding of space is deeply embedded in stories, value-systems and worldviews. Capturing such broad knowledge through the use of a GIS is a tremendous challenge for technicians and practitioners. Resulting maps must be recognizable to those who hold the knowledge, while remaining relatively translatable to the outside world. Digital maps, when developed creatively, collaboratively and cautiously, are essential tools for any community seeking to defend their lands in the face of development projects and other forms of encroachment.

Location: Ambassador A

Marc Dunn
Environmental Director, Niskamoon Corporation
11:30 - 12:00
Panel Presentations: Traditional Use and Occupancy Studies

Participant panel presentations on Traditional Use and Occupancy Studies.

  • We Have TEK… Now What?—Barb Duffin and Sarah Couchie, Mushkegowuk Council
  • Challenges of Mapping Technologies in Considering Indigenous Concepts of Time and Space, Geneviève Reid and Renee Sieber, McGill University
  • GeoLive Referrals App: A Community-Based Approach to App Development—Jon Corbett, UBC, Stephanie Labelle, Wabun Tribal Council, and Jeff Hackett, The Firelight Group

Location: Ambassador A

12:00 - 13:00
Lunch

Location: Ambassador C

13:00 - 14:30
Training Session 1: Direct-to-Digital using Google Earth (Advanced)

In this session, we’ll start with a quick review of the direct-to-digital method for experienced Google Earth users. Then we’ll focus on the challenge of maintaining data collected during field interviews and demonstrate methods in Google Drive, Fusion Tables and ArcGIS for designing and managing data tables linked to a Google Earth KML.

Material: imw2017.earthoutreach.org

Location: TBA

Moka Apiti
Director, Digital Navigators Ltd.
Guy Polden
Researcher, The Firelight Group
13:00 - 14:30
Training Session 1: ArcGIS Online and Platform Overview (Advanced)

This session presents in somewhat more detail capabilities of ArcGIS Online, Esri’s Web-based mapping and analysis platform. Users already familiar with basic GIS concepts will find this session particularly useful. You will learn how to add a custom dataset to the map, how to visualize and filter the data using ArcGIS Online’s Smart Mapping and querying tools, and how to create a basic Web mapping application from a built-in template.

Location: TBA

Jonathan Van Dusen
Higher Education Developer / Analyst, Esri Canada
13:00 - 14:30
Training Session 1: ArcGIS Online and Platform Overview (Beginner)

This session introduces the basics of ArcGIS Online, Esri’s highly functional Web-based mapping platform. You will begin by exploring spatial data in the form of map layers. You will then use the ArcGIS Online Map Viewer to search for content, add your own features to a map, and save and share your completed map with others in your organization or beyond.

Location: TBA

Susie Saliola
Education and Research Analyst, Esri Canada
13:00 - 14:30
Training Session 1: Direct-to-Digital using Google Earth (Beginner)

Learn how to use Google Earth to map places of cultural importance discussed during a field interview. We’ll cover the basics of how to create all the basic feature types for mapping sites of significance: points, lines, and polygons, and image overlays using the direct-to-digital method.

Material: imw2017.earthoutreach.org

Location: TBA

Raleigh Seamster
Program Manager, Google Earth Outreach
Steve DeRoy
Director, The Firelight Group
13:00 - 14:30
Training Session 1: A Free, Open Source Map for Everyone! An Introduction to OpenStreetMap
  • Learn about OpenStreetMap, the global community that creates and maintains it, and how it is used in crisis response and community projects – internationally and locally with the Manitoba GIS User Group (MGUG). Discuss the benefits of creating and using open data, and how you can be involved.
  • Create an account with OpenStreetMap and start adding to the map. We’ll cover how to create all the basic feature types and share how to learn more about editing OpenStreetMap. We will practice examples of adding roads, buildings, and points of interests (like schools, stores etc.).
  • We will practice together, working on a project to improve the data in OSM for Indigenous communities in Canada – Come make sure your community is on the map!
  • Some of the other things we’ll share:
    • How to involve your community with OSM mapathons and youth mapping chapters.
    • How to request support from the OSM community in crisis situations or for community projects.
    • How to get notifications if someone makes changes to the map in your area of interest.

Location: TBA